Graffiti as a Participatory Method Fostering Epistemic Justice and Collective Capabilities among Rural Youth: A case study in Zimbabwe is a chapter by Tendayi Marovah and Faith Mkwananzi in the edited book Participatory Research, Capabilities and Epistemic Justice: A Transformative Agenda for Higher Education. The chapters illustrate how epistemic capabilities can be marginalised by both institutions and structural and historical factors; as well as the potential for possibilities when spaces are opened for genuine participation and designed for a plurality of voices.

This book investigates the power of art to enhance human development and to initiate positive social change for individuals and societies recovering from conflict. Edited by Changing the Story partners Melis Cin and Faith Mkwananzi, the report features contributions from across the CTS network including Aylwyn Walsh, Scott Burnett, Joshua Chikozho, Willard Muntanga, Tendayi Marovah, Laura K. Taylor, Claudia Pineda Marín, Edwin Cubillos, Diego Alfonso, and Nub Raj Bhandari. This book provides an important guide to the role that arts can play in addressing epistemic injustice and contributing to social justice and human development. As such, it will be of interest to international development and arts practitioners, policy makers, and to students and researchers across participatory arts, youth studies, international development, social justice, and peace and conflict studies.

Street Art to Promote Representation and Epistemic Justice among Marginalized Rural Zimbabwean Youth sought to generate democratic space by giving the Binga youth an opportunity to tell the stories they value using graffiti art which was later displayed in exhibitions across Zimbabwe. The following Book of Art showcases the graffiti art created by the Binga youth and the process and idea behind each piece

Changing the Story has produced a series of short videos which address the various aspects of safeguarding in international development research. The aim of the series is to provide you with food for thought, and to help your project team reflect on safeguarding policies and procedures that are appropriate in your context. Two Co-investigators in Zimbabwe position safeguarding within the wider debate around decolonisation of knowledge in international development.

Photo essay on the use of the moringa tree in Zimbabwe by Follow-on Fund project, Transnational and Intergenerational Exploration of Ecological Heritage.

'Street Art to Promote Representation and Epistemic Justice among Marginalized Rural Zimbabwean Youth' focuses on rural Binga, a significantly underdeveloped rural district located in Matabeleland North in Zimbabwe. The area is largely inhabited by the minority group Tonga people who have been subject to marginalisation, social violence and exclusion. The project seeks to document these experiences through participatory street art with the aim of encouraging social cohesion, making their experiences and knowledge visible, and contributing to epistemic justice. Carrington, a young collaborator on the projects talks about his graffiti art creation, which was exhibited in museums and galleries across Zimbabwe.

'Street Art to Promote Representation and Epistemic Justice among Marginalized Rural Zimbabwean Youth' is a Changing the Story Phase 2 ECR project. This is one of several films documenting the personal experiences of the Tonga youth who have been subject to marginalisation, social violence and exclusion, through street art designed and created by the young people themselves.

'Street Art to Promote Representation and Epistemic Justice among Marginalized Rural Zimbabwean Youth' is a Changing the Story Phase 2 ECR project. This is one of several films documenting the personal experiences of the Tonga youth who have been subject to marginalisation, social violence and exclusion, through street art designed and created by the young people themselves.

'Street Art to Promote Representation and Epistemic Justice among Marginalized Rural Zimbabwean Youth' is a Changing the Story Phase 2 ECR project. This is one of several films documenting the personal experiences of the Tonga youth who have been subject to marginalisation, social violence and exclusion, through street art designed and created by the young people themselves.