Issue 10 report is the final report in the Heritage and Our Sustainable Future series, co-produced by PRAXIS, University of Leeds, and the UK Commission for UNESCO, and written by Dr Francesca Giliberto. The report calls for evaluation frameworks to better reflect and capture how cultural heritage contributes to sustainable development. The report features case studies by Harman Sagger (Arts, Heritage, adn Tourism), Jack Philips (DCMS), Jyoti Hosagrahar (World Heritage Centre, UNESCO), Lateefah Alwazzan (Culture|2030, UNESCO), Virginia Moscadelli (Culture|2030, UNESCO).

Issue 9 report from PRAXIS and the UK National Commission for UNESCO on Inclusive Development for Sustainable Cities. The latest report in the Heritage and Our Sustainable Futures series explores the most pressing challenges in historic urban environments, including development, gentrification and migration. The report features case studies from Prof Chris Whitehead, Dr Haili Ma, and Grant Butterworth.

Issue 8 report from PRAXIS and the UK National Commission for UNESCO on Heritage, Disaster Response and Resilience'. The latest report in the Heritage and Our Sustainable Futures series explores the role of heritage in disaster response, recovery, and long-term planning for disaster risk management. The report by Dr. Francesca Giliberto features key insights, recommendations, and case studies from Prof Jennifer Barclay, Dr Karen Pascal, Volcanologist, Ali Raza Rizvi, Annika K. Min and Prof Robin Coningham.

Brief report from the PRAXIS and UK National Commission for UNESCO conference 'Heritage and Our Sustainable Futures' session on 'Using Digital Technology to Innovate' (Oct 2021). The report features key insights, recommendations, and case studies from Isatu Smith, Prof Paul Basu, Prof Tim Unwin, and Prof Mohamed Gamal Abdelmonem.

Issue 3 report brief from the PRAXIS and UK National Commission for UNESCO conference 'Heritage and Our Sustainable Futures' session on Re-thinking Capacity Strengthening for Sustainable Development. The report reflects on harnessing the potential of heritage to rethink current approaches for local capacity strengthening for sustainable development, from formal and informal education, to training and other learning activities. The report features key insights, recommendations, and case studies from Eugene Jo, Dr Nelson Mlambo, Prof Loredana Polezzi, Alfonse M. D’Amato, Judith Hall, and Helen Jones.

Issue 2 brief report from the PRAXIS and UK National Commission for UNESCO conference 'Heritage and Our Sustainable Futures' session on Cultural Heritage for Climate Action. The report reflects on the role that heritage—and more holistic and integrated concepts exemplifying the interdependency between humanity and nature, like biocultural heritage and cultural landscapes—can play in promoting a more sustainable development. The report features key insights, recommendations, and case studies from Dr Sandip Hazareesingh, Dr Albino Jopela, Alice Lyall, and Dr Rebecca Jones.

Issue 1 brief report from the PRAXIS and UK National Commission for UNESCO conference 'Heritage and Our Sustainable Futures' session on biocultural heritage and landscapes (Feb, 2021). This session focused on biocultural heritage and cultural landscapes, holistic and integrated concepts which exemplify the interdependency between humanity and nature. The report features key insights, recommendations, and case studies from Dr Rosalind Bryce and Dr Maya Ishizawa.

Narrating Career in Social Entrepreneurship: Experiences of Social Entrepreneurs by Andreana Drencheva, Jian Li Yew, and Wee Chan Au. The purpose of this qualitative study is to contribute to the scholarship on career success within the social entrepreneurship context. Based on the career accounts of eighteen social entrepreneurs in Malaysia, the study’s findings provide a nuanced perspective of the Career Success Framework and explicate career success for social entrepreneurs as multifaceted across personal and social goals. The findings provide nuance to how the four broad dimensions of the Career Success Framework (material concerns, social relations, learning and pursuing one’s own projects) are experienced and perceived in the social entrepreneurship context. The emergent career success framework of social entrepreneurs suggests that perceived career success is appraised with nine sub-dimensions captured within the broad dimensions of the Career Success Framework in ways that challenge taken-for-granted assumptions in careers research, while also highlighting the tensions social entrepreneurs face.

This article by Henry Redwood, Tiffany Fairey, and Jasmin Hasić provides an analytical case study of a participatory youth-led filmmaking project in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Using the conceptual framework of hybridity, it critically considers whether and to what extent youth centred, participatory arts projects can facilitate the emergence of a positive hybrid peace.

Longing for Lost Normalcy: Social Memory, Transitional Justice, and the ‘House Museum’ to Missing Persons in Kosovo by Schwandner-Sievers, S. and Klinkner, M. In spring 1999, amidst a wider ethnic cleansing campaign, Serb police forces abducted Ferdonije Qerkezi’s husband and four sons, who were never to be seen alive again. She subsequently transformed her private house into a memorial to the lost normalcy of her entire social world. The authors trace this memorialization process; her struggle for recognition; her transformation into an iconic mother of the nation and her activism, both for missing persons and against the internationally-driven Serb-Albanian normalization process in Kosovo. From a multi-disciplinary perspective, the authors critically reflect on the theoretical concept of “normative divergence” in intervention studies.

The latest briefing from the ¿Cuál es la verdad? Project reflects on our learning experience of supporting a group of young people to set up a multi-strand social enterprise called ‘4 Esquinas’ (the 4 Corners). Initiated, developed and realised by our young participants, 4 Esquinas aims to identify opportunities to overcome social injustice and exclusion and to improve socio-economic conditions in the local community.

While digital methods have been around for some time, the COVID-19 pandemic has required projects around the world to move to the digital sphere and adapt their approaches accordingly. In the new ¿Cuál es la verdad? project briefing, 'Participatory digital methodologies with young people in “fragile” contexts' the project team reflect on their learning in relation to engaging digitally with young people who have been ‘marginalised’ (in terms of structural inequalities and locations) and live in contexts that are considered ‘fragile’ due to violence and conflict. Participatory digital methodologies with young people in “fragile” contexts

Si bien los métodos digitales han existido durante algún tiempo, la pandemia de COVID-19 ha requerido que proyectos en todo el mundo se muevan a la esfera digital y adapten sus enfoques en consecuencia. En el nuevo ¿Cuál es la verdad? En el informe del proyecto, el equipo del proyecto reflexiona sobre su aprendizaje en relación con la interacción digital con los jóvenes que han sido "marginados" (en términos de desigualdades estructurales y ubicaciones) y viven en contextos que se consideran "frágiles" debido a la violencia y el conflicto.

Case study introduction Youth-led social enterprises (Malaysia) investigates the lived experiences of young social entrepreneurs and how social enterprises contribute (positively and/or negatively) to civil society. Discover the project highlights in this bite size case study.

Graffiti as a Participatory Method Fostering Epistemic Justice and Collective Capabilities among Rural Youth: A case study in Zimbabwe is a chapter by Tendayi Marovah and Faith Mkwananzi in the edited book Participatory Research, Capabilities and Epistemic Justice: A Transformative Agenda for Higher Education. The chapters illustrate how epistemic capabilities can be marginalised by both institutions and structural and historical factors; as well as the potential for possibilities when spaces are opened for genuine participation and designed for a plurality of voices.

Listen to the jungle, the rivers and the voices of young people from the Atrato River populations, one of the areas hardest hit in the country by the conflict. Alejandro Castillejo-Cuéllar (Phase 1 Colombia Project 'Tales of the Future) has been collecting the sounds of a region to understand, from the territories, concepts such as peace, justice and reconciliation.

Jaideep Gupte is Fellow of the Institute of Development Studies, at University of Sussex and the Cities and Sustainable Infrastructure Challenge Leader at the UKRI. Listen to Jaideep's thoughts on the Heritage for Global Challenges Nexus Event.

Opera Circus, a performing arts organisations in the UK worked with Changing the Story with a small project in Bosnia and Herzegovina called Izazov! (provocation/challenge). 4 films were made by 5 young people from BiH, UK and Italy which expressed their concerns about their lives, their families and their future. None of them were trained in the making of documentary films. Robert Golden professional photographer and film maker mentored the process which was researched by 3 academics from Kings College London and Sarajevo School of Science and Technology. CtS was led by Leeds University UK.