Report from PRAXIS & the UK National Commission for UNESCO on 'Creative Industries and Tourism: Beyond Economic Development', which explores the role of heritage-based tourism and creativity in promoting inclusive development. The report features key insights, recommendations, and case studies from Prof Sophia Labadi, Prof Steven Mithen, Ceasar Bita, Leila Ben-Gacem, Prof Paul Heritage, and Dr Jon Henderson, and written by Dr Francesca Giliberto, University of Leeds.

Issue 3 report brief from the PRAXIS and UK National Commission for UNESCO conference 'Heritage and Our Sustainable Futures' session on Re-thinking Capacity Strengthening for Sustainable Development. The report reflects on harnessing the potential of heritage to rethink current approaches for local capacity strengthening for sustainable development, from formal and informal education, to training and other learning activities. The report features key insights, recommendations, and case studies from Eugene Jo, Dr Nelson Mlambo, Prof Loredana Polezzi, Alfonse M. D’Amato, Judith Hall, and Helen Jones.

Issue 2 brief report from the PRAXIS and UK National Commission for UNESCO conference 'Heritage and Our Sustainable Futures' session on Cultural Heritage for Climate Action. The report reflects on the role that heritage—and more holistic and integrated concepts exemplifying the interdependency between humanity and nature, like biocultural heritage and cultural landscapes—can play in promoting a more sustainable development. The report features key insights, recommendations, and case studies from Dr Sandip Hazareesingh, Dr Albino Jopela, Alice Lyall, and Dr Rebecca Jones.

The latest briefing from the ¿Cuál es la verdad? Project reflects on our learning experience of supporting a group of young people to set up a multi-strand social enterprise called ‘4 Esquinas’ (the 4 Corners). Initiated, developed and realised by our young participants, 4 Esquinas aims to identify opportunities to overcome social injustice and exclusion and to improve socio-economic conditions in the local community.

While digital methods have been around for some time, the COVID-19 pandemic has required projects around the world to move to the digital sphere and adapt their approaches accordingly. In the new ¿Cuál es la verdad? project briefing, 'Participatory digital methodologies with young people in “fragile” contexts' the project team reflect on their learning in relation to engaging digitally with young people who have been ‘marginalised’ (in terms of structural inequalities and locations) and live in contexts that are considered ‘fragile’ due to violence and conflict. Participatory digital methodologies with young people in “fragile” contexts

Si bien los métodos digitales han existido durante algún tiempo, la pandemia de COVID-19 ha requerido que proyectos en todo el mundo se muevan a la esfera digital y adapten sus enfoques en consecuencia. En el nuevo ¿Cuál es la verdad? En el informe del proyecto, el equipo del proyecto reflexiona sobre su aprendizaje en relación con la interacción digital con los jóvenes que han sido "marginados" (en términos de desigualdades estructurales y ubicaciones) y viven en contextos que se consideran "frágiles" debido a la violencia y el conflicto.

The Creative Expression and Contemporary Arts Making Among Young Cambodians research project analysed the creative practices and concerns of young adult artists (18-35 years old) in contemporary Cambodia. The project examined the extent to which the arts are being used to open up new ways of enacting Cambodian identity that encompass, but also move beyond, a preoccupation with the Khmer Rouge (1975-1979). Existing research has focused on how the recuperation and revival of traditional performance is linked to the post-genocidal reconstruction of the nation. In contrast, this research examines if, and how, young artists are moving beyond the revival process to create works that speak to a young Cambodian population. The research used NGO Cambodian Living Arts’ 2020 Cultural Season of performances, workshops, and talks as a case study through which to examine key concerns of young Cambodian artists, trace how these affected their creative process, and analyse how the resulting works were received among audiences. Find out more in the project report.

On March 3, 2021, Changing the Story and Oxfam welcomed practitioners, researchers, youth, and colleagues to an online discussion on how national and international NGOs can engage in creativity, connection and collective creation with young people. Dr Amanda Rogers (University of Swansea), Reaksmey Yean (Centre for Khmer Studies), and Sokhorn Yon (Cambodian Living Arts) of Changing the Story research project ‘Contemporary Arts Making and Creative Expression among Young Cambodians’, were invited to frame a discussion, drawing on their experience of arts-based research and knowledge of the arts and culture in the Cambodian context. In sharing this summary of the emerging ideas and questions, we aim to provoke further dialogue on how organisations can engage in collective creation with young people.

Read the latest publication from Nub Raj Bhandari, a Phase 2 Partner on Interpreting Civic National Values (Kenya), titled 'To what extent does religious orientation and educational attainment deform gendered attitudes between wives and husbands?'

Nub Raj Bhandari, from the Janaki Women Awareness Society and co-investigator of one of our Phase 2 projects, investigates the causality between school attendance and likelihood of child marriage in Nepal, in an article recently published in the Journal of International Women's Studies (2019).

On April 18, twelve trainee teachers, including students from Takeo province and three from the local area, themselves children of former Khmer Rouge, participated in the tour. Preparing for the journey to Anlong Veng, the students from Takeo wondered what they would learn from the visit, and what to expect from the tour. Were the former Khmer Rouge residents living in Anlong Veng be so different in their beliefs, attitudes, and culture? Several students had little familiarity – or belief – in the history of the Khmer Rouge in general. The April 2018 Peace Tour also marked a particularly important moment within the wider Changing the Story project. While tour participants had previously been assigned research tasks to draft reports on the history and experiences of local residents, the April 2018 tour was the first deployment of participatory film-making methods as a means for students to explore the stories of local residents and former Khmer Rouge. Working in groups of four, the student-teachers were trained in the use of audio-visual equipment ‘on-site’, identifying key themes and questions for their films to explore, before conducting interviews and capturing footage of key sites in the area. The ‘multiplication’ effect of the participatory-film making approach is significant: the trainee-teachers will be able to incorporate their films within their own teaching as they return to their schools.

Written by Lura Pollozhani and Hajrulla Çeku, this critical review of the Phase One Kosovo project ACT: Arts, Critical Thinking and Active Citizenship will explore the overarching research questions: how does formal and informal civic education affect youth engagement and active citizenship in Kosovo, and does art activism among youth promote more critical levels of engagement?

Fragments on Heroes, Artists and Interventions: Challenging Gender Ideology and Provoking Active Citizenship through the Arts in Kosovo is a chapter in the edited book Cooke, P. and Soria-Dolan, I., eds. Participatory Arts in International Development. London: Routledge

“Heritage for Global Challenges” (24-26 February 2020, West Bek’aa, Lebanon) was a three-day workshop organized by Praxis with the goal to champion the distinctive contribution that Arts and Humanities research can make to tackle urgent global development challenges, focusing on heritage, in particular. This Heritage for Global Challenges Lebanon Workshop...

Tribal Education Methodology (TEM) is designed to have a meaningful intervention into tribal education and state curriculum of Kerala. Unlike earlier initiatives that promoted alternative educational models that ran parallel to the State curriculum, TEM attempts to integrate the tribal arts, culture, oral traditions of knowledge to restructure the state school curriculum. The activities of the project are aimed at lessen the gap in scientific research in the field to empower tribal pedagogy as a tool for decolonising the education for transformative learning. The District of Wayanad has five Model Residential Schools (MRS) for tribal young learners and all the activities of the project are initiated in all MRS. Hear from the Chief District Administrator about the Tribal Education Methodology Project.

Tribal Education Methodology (TEM) is designed to have a meaningful intervention into tribal education and state curriculum of Kerala. Unlike earlier initiatives that promoted alternative educational models that ran parallel to the State curriculum, TEM attempts to integrate the tribal arts, culture, oral traditions of knowledge to restructure the state school curriculum. The activities of the project are aimed at lessen the gap in scientific research in the field to empower tribal pedagogy as a tool for decolonising the education for transformative learning. The District of Wayanad has five Model Residential Schools (MRS) for tribal young learners and all the activities of the project are initiated in all MRS. The following footage is taken from the Tribal Education Methodology Theatre Workshop.

Tribal Education Methodology (TEM) is designed to have a meaningful intervention into tribal education and state curriculum of Kerala. Unlike earlier initiatives that promoted alternative educational models that ran parallel to the State curriculum, TEM attempts to integrate the tribal arts, culture, oral traditions of knowledge to restructure the state school curriculum. The activities of the project are aimed at lessen the gap in scientific research in the field to empower tribal pedagogy as a tool for decolonising the education for transformative learning. The District of Wayanad has five Model Residential Schools (MRS) for tribal young learners and all the activities of the project are initiated in all MRS. The video features youth collaborators on the Tribal Education Methodology project.

Tribal Education Methodology (TEM): Sustainable Education through Heritage and Performance is a Phase 2 Large Grant project in India. Watch the final project film, 'Onru Nillava.'

Festival programme for a hybrid event that took place 14-18 June 2021 in person in Kosovo and online. It featured the launch of the artwork installation “The Square of Untruth”, sessions from CTS projects Respace, CoLearnSEE, and The Making of the Museum of Education about their research and findings at the ‘Perspectives on Past, Present and Future.