Graffiti as a Participatory Method Fostering Epistemic Justice and Collective Capabilities among Rural Youth: A case study in Zimbabwe is a chapter by Tendayi Marovah and Faith Mkwananzi in the edited book Participatory Research, Capabilities and Epistemic Justice: A Transformative Agenda for Higher Education. The chapters illustrate how epistemic capabilities can be marginalised by both institutions and structural and historical factors; as well as the potential for possibilities when spaces are opened for genuine participation and designed for a plurality of voices.

Street Art to Promote Representation and Epistemic Justice among Marginalized Rural Zimbabwean Youth sought to generate democratic space by giving the Binga youth an opportunity to tell the stories they value using graffiti art which was later displayed in exhibitions across Zimbabwe. The following Book of Art showcases the graffiti art created by the Binga youth and the process and idea behind each piece

YouthLead (Colombia) is a participatory arts research project and collaboration between Queen's University Belfast, National Centre for Historical Memory, Konrad Lorenz University and Gestores de Paz. which addresses two broad research questions. First, how are young people in Colombia tackling the legacy of violence, and second, how can the arts amplify the voices of young people?

'Street Art to Promote Representation and Epistemic Justice among Marginalized Rural Zimbabwean Youth' focuses on rural Binga, a significantly underdeveloped rural district located in Matabeleland North in Zimbabwe. The area is largely inhabited by the minority group Tonga people who have been subject to marginalisation, social violence and exclusion. The project seeks to document these experiences through participatory street art with the aim of encouraging social cohesion, making their experiences and knowledge visible, and contributing to epistemic justice. Carrington, a young collaborator on the projects talks about his graffiti art creation, which was exhibited in museums and galleries across Zimbabwe.

'Street Art to Promote Representation and Epistemic Justice among Marginalized Rural Zimbabwean Youth' is a Changing the Story Phase 2 ECR project. This is one of several films documenting the personal experiences of the Tonga youth who have been subject to marginalisation, social violence and exclusion, through street art designed and created by the young people themselves.

'Street Art to Promote Representation and Epistemic Justice among Marginalized Rural Zimbabwean Youth' is a Changing the Story Phase 2 ECR project. This is one of several films documenting the personal experiences of the Tonga youth who have been subject to marginalisation, social violence and exclusion, through street art designed and created by the young people themselves.

'Street Art to Promote Representation and Epistemic Justice among Marginalized Rural Zimbabwean Youth' is a Changing the Story Phase 2 ECR project. This is one of several films documenting the personal experiences of the Tonga youth who have been subject to marginalisation, social violence and exclusion, through street art designed and created by the young people themselves.