Changing the Story Publications

Check out a range of working papers and critical reviews, as well as our latest annual report in this section that features our growing bank of Changing the Story produced resources.

This working paper examines the use of interdisciplinary arts-based approaches to peacebuilding through the Mobile Arts for Peace (MAP) project in Rwanda. The authors of this essay will provide an overview of the project design and research methodologies of MAP; serving as a reflection of creative approaches in conflict transformation processes to strengthen individual and community-level tolerance for paradox and ambiguity. This reflection process is being used to inform our knowledge and understanding of how MAP might contribute to the subject of Music, Dance and Drama in the National Curriculum Framework of Rwanda.
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Written by Alejandro Castillejo Cuellar and investigators Alex Sierra and Juanita Frankey, the following critical review of the Phase 1 Colombia project Tales of the Future: Senses, Creativity and the Arts of Survival in Colombia discusses the need to put forward itinerant methodological proposals centring on testimonial experiences as means of articulating possible futures.
Arts of Survival (Colombia) Critical Review
Written by Alejandro Castillejo Cuellar and investigators Alex Sierra and Juanita Frankey, the following critical review of the Phase 1 Colombia project Tales of the Future: Senses, Creativity and the Arts of Survival in Colombia discusses the need to put forward itinerant methodological proposals centring on testimonial experiences as means of articulating possible futures.
Arts of Survival (Colombia) Critical Review
Changing the Story is featured in the latest publication by Cultural Heritage: A Challenge for Europe, a publication about the role of cultural heritage in building national identity in post conflict situations. The publication follows a conference in Warsaw (10-12 September) organised by the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage of the Rebuplic of Poland, the National Institute for Museums and Public Collections, in cooperation with Memorial and Museum Auschwitz-Birkenau, Emanuel Ringelblum Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw and Stuttof Museum, attending by Changing the Story Principal Investigator Paul Cooke.
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Written by Dr Simon Dancey and Emily Morrison this critical review of the Phase One Colombia project explores what is known about social imaginaries in Colombia in existing literature and how the imaginary affects the practical projects of those working through culture to achieve social and cultural aims (with a focus on young people), analysed through the voices of an investigation interviewing cultural actors from across Colombia.
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Written by Lura Pollozhani and Hajrulla Çeku, this critical review of the Phase One Kosovo project ACT: Arts, Critical Thinking and Active Citizenship will explore the overarching research questions: how does formal and informal civic education affect youth engagement and active citizenship in Kosovo, and does art activism among youth promote more critical levels of engagement?
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As part of Changing the Story's Phase One Activities is Rwanda this critical review and project reflection maps out the work of the project taking place in both public and private spaces in relation to the use of art in fostering peacebuilding in post-genocide Rwanda. The aim of the critical review is to record convergences, synergies and challenges within the Mobile Arts for Peace project (MAP). The critical review is comprised of a youth report, teachers report and an artist report and outlines the methodologies used, as well as the influence and impact of the project on each group.
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As part of Changing the Story’s Phase One activities in Cambodia, this critical review and project reflection explores the use of arts within attempts to redress and remember experiences of the Khmer Rouge, with a particular focus on the varying participatory and educational methods employed therein. We necessarily and deliberately employ a broad definition of ‘participation’ in order to sensitise readers to the variety of ways participation has been integrated and mobilised in the work of both state and civil society led initiatives. The critical review then turns to reflect on the work of Changing the Story through our collaboration with the Documentation Center of Cambodia (DC-Cam). Specifically, we seek to draw lessons from the introduction of participatory filmmaking approaches to DC-Cam’s Anlong Veng Peace Tours initiatives from April to December 2018.
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It's been an extraordinary first 12 months for Changing the Story. Read our first published annual report for a closer look at our achievements across and beyond our 5 Phase 1 projects.
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In March 2019, 90 people from 16 countries around the world came together in Phnomh Penh, Cambodia for a three-day international workshop “Learning from the past with and for young people: Intergenerational dialogue, education, and memory after genocide”. The following report written by PhD candidate Katie Hodginson, describes, evaluates and outlines the key insights from the workshop.
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In March 2018, Prof Chaya Herman, Dr Charity Meki-Kombe and Prof Stuart Taberner conducted a critical evaluation and review of Changing the Story Phase 1 project 'The Change-makers.' The report comprises of three sections: The context around The Change-makers programme, a critical evaluation and review report, and finally, the Change-makers programme roll out through 'train the trainer' workshops report, providing an in-depth and fascinating insight into, and evaluation of, one of Changing the Story's original projects.
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"Dark pasts – brighter futures? Mobilising histories of discrimination, persecution and genocide to make progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals". The legacy of traumatic pasts – including internal displacement, war and genocide – is one of the most serious obstacles to development in post-conflict states. The Mobilising Histories workshop, which was organised by the University of Leeds and the South African Holocaust and Genocide Foundation, and supported through the UK Global Challenges Research Fund, brought together academics and practitioners (from NGOs and civil society organisations), to learn from each other, and share their experience of devising arts interventions that mobilise ‘dark pasts’ to promote social justice agendas.
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"Arts-based research practices and alternatives: Reflections on workshops in Uganda and Bangladesh" by Ruth Kelly and Emilie Flower. "In July 2017, two groups of academics, artists and activists held research workshops in Kampala and in Dhaka to explore how art could help us imagine and inhabit new ways of being, feeling and knowing, opening space to begin to articulate alternatives. We worked from the premise that imagination is not just something we have; it's something we generate together, through shared experiences, languages and ideas; through image, stories, dance, and music. Tapping into the rich cultural and artistic heritage of the places we come from, participants used art to experience the world differently and to dream up visions of a more just and sustainable world. [...] In this working paper, we (Emilie Flower and Ruth Kelly) situate, describe and reflect on the two three-day workshops in Kampala, Uganda and Dhaka Bangladesh. We explore whether and how arts-based research practices can disrupt dominant ways of knowing and performing ‘development,’ allowing activists and practitioners to explore different ways of knowing and to identify and articulate alternatives".
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"Mobilising the Past to Support Human Rights and the UN Sustainable Development Goals" This literature review, authored by Emma Parker (University of Leeds) has been compiled as part of the AHRC-funded project, ‘Mobilising Multidirectional Memory to Build more Resilient Communities in South Africa’ (Taberner and Boswell, 2017). It offers a selective annotated bibliography of scholarship, projects and literature examining how memories of dark pasts intersect with both the arts and international development goals. With a particular focus on recent developments in memory studies, it includes discussions of literature and human rights, film, photography, the performing arts, heritage sites and digital memory. While being by no means extensive, it reflects some of the current research in these intersecting areas, demonstrating how efforts to understand difficult or traumatic pasts may be mobilised to shape better futures.
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As a starting point for the work Prof. Paul Cooke will be doing on the network, along with at least some of the other colleagues involved, we are working on the first of a series of ‘#ChangingTheStory working papers’ on the website that explores the relationship of participatory art within the context of development. This first paper, entitled " 'Post-Participatory' Arts for the 'Post-Development' Era" is co-authored with our project manager Inés Soria-Turner, and is aimed at framing a set of papers which will appear as the result of the initial work that was undertook during an international seminar in Leeds in February 2017 and subsequently during a series of participatory video projects in South Africa, Brazil and India as part of the University of Leeds' previous GCRF grant 'Voicing Hidden Histories: Troubling the National Brand'. Image credit: Members of the young women's filming group in Codó, Maranhão taking a break from filming as part of the Brazilian strand of 'Voicing Hidden Histories'.
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